Haverhill Public Schools Sixth Annual Math Museum

The purpose of the Math Museum is to present all HPS students, Kindergarten through high school, with an exciting opportunity through which they can …
  • Enhance their math knowledge by exploring a math topic and communicating their mathematical ideas.
  • Make connections between math and the world around them.
  • Learn about a math topic not typically taught during the school year.
  • Promote their self-esteem through an independent education process.
  • Learn what it takes to prepare and deliver a successful presentation.
The project can be done in school or at home … as a class, in a small group, or individually.
Tuesday - June 9, 20154:00pm- 5:30pmAwards Ceremony & Reception @ 5:15pmHaverhill High School Library

Each school may submit no more than 3 entries per grade level. Entries must be submitted to HHS by Monday, June 9th @ noon.

Please review the Rubric Organization & General Info document for more details. A folder with this information has been given to each school. These documents will also be sent electronically to each math teacher. If you have any questions, please contact Patty Juranovits (Math Curriculum Supervisor) at 420-1904 orpjuranovits@haverhill-ps.org


Math Museum Project
Organization and General Information
General Ideas:
  • Students may work individually or in small groups.
  • Students will be required to do their research and design & prepare their displays. If selected for the district-wide event, students should also be prepared to present their project to the public.
  • Teachers need to take time to share guidelines, discuss possible topics, and offer suggestions.
  • Topics should … be challenging - ones that take time to work through … encourage students to develop problem-solving skills … be approved before students begin their work … ones typically not covered in the regular math curriculum.
  • For the earlier grades, some teachers have the entire class work together on one project.
  • Use the rubric to help clarify requirements
The Displays:
v As simple or as elaborate as you want, as long as they fit on a space approximately 2 feet by 3 feet.
v Two purposes: to help present the topic to the Math Museum visitors, and to tempt the visitors to learn the math and get involved.
v It is recommended NOT to display the solutions in an obvious part of the display … let the Math Museum visitors do the thinking
v Parts to include ~title ~question to be explored and researched ~strategies used to arrive at key points and conclusion ~description of activity~important diagrams, charts, graphs, visuals ~background information & research ~conclusion ~further questions that could be explored

Different types of displays

  • A tri-fold board that describes the topic/problem, with any manipulatives on the table in front of the board. The tri-fold board can be a commercial one, or home-made from cardboard boxes.
  • Presented on art paper that lies flat on the desk or table. Depending on the area, it may be hung on the wall.
  • 3-dimensional … use a variety of materials such as milk crates, cardboard boxes, etc., which were covered with art paper or cloth.
  • The district-wide Math Museum will be set up at HHS Library. Students may choose to “man” their display and offer explanations. (OPTIONAL)
  • Each school may submit 3 projects per grade level.
  • An “in-house” Math Museum may be held in individual schools or classrooms to provide students with an opportunity to share their expertise and make decisions re: which projects will be submitted to the district-wide “museum.”
  • Parents & guardians, other students, school staff, and members of the community will be invited.
  • Projects will be judged using a scoring rubric; awards will be given to top scorers.

Presenting to the public:

  • The district-wide Math Museum will be set up at HHS Library. Students may choose to “man” their display and offer explanations. (OPTIONAL)
  • Each school may submit 3 projects per grade level.
  • An “in-house” Math Museum may be held in individual schools or classrooms to provide students with an opportunity to share their expertise and make decisions re: which projects will be submitted to the district-wide “museum.”
  • Parents & guardians, other students, school staff, and members of the community will be invited.
  • Projects will be judged using a scoring rubric; awards will be given to top scorers.

Math Museum Topic Ideas Document

Math Museum Topic Ideas (2).doc
Math Museum Topic Ideas (2).doc
Math Museum Topic Ideas (2).doc



Math Museum Rubric
Rubric for Math Museum Project HPS 2014.doc
Rubric for Math Museum Project HPS 2014.doc
Rubric for Math Museum Project HPS 2014.doc